The Hard Truth About Soft Skills

Soft Skills Quiz

What keeps people from getting where they want to go at work? It’s rarely a shortfall in technical expertise that limits them, but rather a shortcoming in their social, communication, and self-management behaviors. Yet although research and companies alike are waking up to the value of soft skills in the workplace, most of us are still on our own when it comes to developing our personal soft skills repertoire.

Now, there’s no longer any reason to learn your soft skills the hard way. This quick and anonymous self-assessment quiz will help you identify your strengths and where you need improvement in the soft skills arena.

Be sure to respond to each of the 24 items below in order to obtain your results. After reading the item, click on the bubble that best applies: True Mostly True Mostly Untrue Untrue

When you are finished, click the Results button at the end to receive feedback about which of your soft skills areas need improvement and customized advice from Peggy Klaus, author of The Hard Truth About Soft Skills — Workplace Lessons Smart People Wish They’d Learned Sooner.

If you’re ready to take your career to the next level, then TAKE 24 now.

  1. Other people (bosses, co-workers, etc.) are holding my career back.
                 



  2. Intuition and feelings should be considered when making important business decisions.
                 



  3. Luck is something you either have or you don't.
                 



  4. Working harder and being more organized will stop procrastination in its tracks.
                 



  5. Before I communicate with someone, I first find out their preferred method of contact from me (i.e. voice mail, email, memos, in-person, etc.).
                 



  6. I always apologize when I've done something wrong.
                 



  7. People at work judge me primarily by how well I do my job.
                 



  8. I'm willing to ask seemingly stupid questions when I don't understand something.
                 



  9. I make an effort to form and maintain connections with the higher-ups at work.
                 



  10. Office politics should be avoided.
                 



  11. If I'm unhappy with my boss, it's ok to go over his or her head.
                 



  12. When it comes to dating someone at work, what I do on my own time is my own business.
                 



  13. I keep colleagues and my supervisors updated about my current projects.
                 



  14. Team players should make sure they are given credit for their individual contributions.
                 



  15. Telecommuters inevitably fall off of everyone's radar.
                 



  16. The only time I talk about my accomplishments is during my performance review.
                 



  17. Crying on the job is ok if someone feels humiliated or has been yelled at.
                 



  18. Older employees who have been around for a long time are stuck in the past and get in the way of progress.
                 



  19. Connecting with colleagues by acknowledging their feelings will have a positive impact on the bottom line.
                 



  20. If everyone I worked with was more like me, it would be easier to get things done.
                 



  21. People won't do what you want unless they like you.
                 



  22. Leaders are responsible for strategy and the big picture while managers take care of the day-to-day operations.
                 



  23. It's never ok to be rude to someone, even when they are incompetent.
                 



  24. When a boss or supervisor bullies you in public, they must be confronted about it then and there.
                 



Client Testimonial

Behind Klaus's easy-flowing prose lies a buffet of skills to nourish your career advancement, from taking intelligent risks to examining your intuitive responses to confronting your critics. Avoid The Hard Truth at your peril

Harry Karvos
Associate Dean for Administration, Columbia Law School.